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  • Thursday, 29 February 2024
As Turkey earthquakes death toll grows, so does anger at government

As Turkey earthquakes death toll grows, so does anger at government

The death toll from a series of powerful earthquakes that struck Turkey's Aegean coast in October has risen to over 100, with more than 1,000 people injured. As the country struggles to recover from the disaster, many are expressing anger and frustration at the government's response.

The earthquakes, which struck on October 30 and October 31, caused widespread damage to buildings and infrastructure in the cities of Izmir and Manisa. Rescue workers continue to search for survivors amid the rubble, with hopes dwindling as each day passes.

Critics have accused the government of failing to adequately prepare for the disaster and of responding too slowly to the crisis. They point to a lack of building codes and safety regulations in the affected areas, as well as a lack of resources for emergency services.

The government has defended its response, arguing that it has provided necessary support to the affected communities. However, many are skeptical of these claims, pointing to a history of corruption and mismanagement in the country's public sector.

The earthquakes have also raised concerns about Turkey's broader political situation. The country has been beset by a series of crises in recent years, including a failed coup attempt in 2016 and a worsening economic crisis.

Critics argue that the government's focus on consolidating power and cracking down on dissent has come at the expense of investing in public infrastructure and services. They also accuse the government of stoking nationalist and religious tensions to distract from its failures.

The earthquakes have added to a growing sense of frustration and disillusionment among many Turks. Despite the government's efforts to downplay the scale of the disaster and to present a united front in the face of tragedy, many are calling for greater accountability and transparency.

As the country continues to grapple with the aftermath of the earthquakes, there are growing calls for a more comprehensive approach to disaster preparedness and response. This will require not only greater investment in infrastructure and emergency services, but also a willingness to address the underlying political and social issues that have contributed to Turkey's ongoing crisis.

The death toll from a series of powerful earthquakes that struck Turkey's Aegean coast in October has risen to over 100, with more than 1,000 people injured. As the country struggles to recover from the disaster, many are expressing anger and frustration at the government's response.

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