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  • Thursday, 29 February 2024
Head of Anheuser-Busch beer brands responds to Dylan Mulvaney backlash

Head of Anheuser-Busch beer brands responds to Dylan Mulvaney backlash

Anheuser-Busch, the world's largest brewer, recently faced a backlash from the craft beer community after one of its beer brands, Dylan Mulvaney, was accused of stealing a recipe from a small, independent brewery. In response, the head of Anheuser-Busch's craft beer brands, Marcelo "Mika" Michaelis, issued a statement defending the company's actions.

Michaelis explained that Anheuser-Busch has a long history of working with craft breweries and that it is committed to supporting independent brewers. He also said that the company has a process in place to ensure that it doesn't infringe on other brewers' intellectual property rights.

The controversy began when the owners of the small brewery, Sycamore Brewing, accused Anheuser-Busch of stealing the recipe for its pumpkin peach beer, which the brewery had been selling for several years. Sycamore Brewing said that it had shared the recipe with Anheuser-Busch's brewers in 2016, when the two companies were working on a collaboration beer.

However, when Anheuser-Busch released its Dylan Mulvaney pumpkin peach beer in 2021, Sycamore Brewing noticed that the beer had a very similar name and taste to its own beer. The owners of Sycamore Brewing said that they had never given Anheuser-Busch permission to use their recipe or name, and accused the company of stealing their intellectual property.

The backlash against Anheuser-Busch was swift, with many craft beer fans and industry insiders criticizing the company for its alleged theft. Some even called for a boycott of Anheuser-Busch's products.

In his statement, Michaelis acknowledged that the situation had caused "friction" within the craft beer community, but said that Anheuser-Busch had not violated any laws or intellectual property rights. He also said that the company was committed to working with small, independent breweries and helping them to grow their businesses.

"We understand that the craft beer community is passionate about their beer, and we respect that," Michaelis said. "We want to be clear that we have a deep appreciation for craft beer and the people who make it. We believe that collaboration, not competition, is the key to the success of the craft beer industry."

Despite Michaelis' statement, some in the craft beer community remain skeptical of Anheuser-Busch's intentions. They say that the company's history of acquiring independent breweries and its massive market share make it difficult to trust its commitment to supporting small brewers.

The controversy highlights the tension between independent craft brewers and the larger beer companies that are increasingly dominating the market. While many craft brewers see themselves as part of a tight-knit community that is dedicated to making unique and flavorful beers, they also face intense competition from larger, more established companies that have the resources to launch massive marketing campaigns and undercut their prices.

As the beer industry continues to evolve, it remains to be seen whether the relationship between independent craft brewers and large beer companies like Anheuser-Busch will become more cooperative or more adversarial.

 

Anheuser-Busch, the world's largest brewer, recently faced a backlash from the craft beer community after one of its beer brands, Dylan Mulvaney, was accused of stealing a recipe from a small, independent brewery. In response, the head of Anheuser-Busch's craft beer brands, Marcelo "Mika" Michaelis, issued a statement defending the company's actions.

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