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  • Saturday, 24 February 2024
Newsom's California pushes billions in reparations payments as state faces budget deficit disaster

Newsom's California pushes billions in reparations payments as state faces budget deficit disaster

California Governor Gavin Newsom has proposed a plan to pay reparations to descendants of enslaved Black Americans as part of the state's efforts to address systemic racism. The proposal, which is part of a $100 billion budget plan, would allocate $1.4 billion towards direct payments to eligible individuals and their families.

The reparations payments would be targeted towards descendants of enslaved Black Americans who have lived in California since 1850 and have suffered from discriminatory laws and practices such as redlining, exclusionary housing policies, and police brutality. The proposal would also fund investments in education, housing, and business development for Black Californians.

The announcement comes at a time when California is facing a massive budget deficit due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Newsom's budget plan includes a $75.7 billion surplus, which is largely due to federal COVID-19 relief funds, but the state still faces a $15 billion shortfall in the coming years.

Critics of the proposal argue that the state cannot afford to make such payments when it is already facing a budget crisis. They also question the eligibility criteria and the potential difficulty of determining who qualifies for the payments.

However, supporters of the plan argue that reparations are long overdue and necessary to address the historical injustices and systemic racism that continue to impact Black Americans today. They also note that the proposal includes significant investments in education, housing, and business development, which could help address longstanding disparities in these areas.

If the proposal is approved by the state legislature, California would become the first state in the U.S. to provide reparations to descendants of enslaved Black Americans.

In other news, the United States has surpassed 500,000 deaths from COVID-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The grim milestone was reached just over a year after the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the country.

President Joe Biden held a moment of silence and addressed the nation on February 22 to mark the occasion. He urged Americans to continue taking precautions to prevent the spread of the virus, including wearing masks and practicing social distancing.

The U.S. has also made significant progress in vaccinating the population against COVID-19. As of March 12, over 97 million doses of the vaccine had been administered, and more than 32 million people had been fully vaccinated.

However, concerns remain about new variants of the virus, including the B.1.1.7 variant first identified in the United Kingdom, which is believed to be more contagious and possibly more deadly than earlier strains. The CDC has urged Americans to continue taking precautions and getting vaccinated as soon as possible.

In international news, protests have erupted in Myanmar following a military coup on February 1. The military arrested and detained civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other government officials, claiming that the November 2020 election was fraudulent.

Protesters have taken to the streets in cities across the country, calling for the release of Suu Kyi and the restoration of civilian rule. The military has responded with violence, using tear gas, water cannons, and live ammunition to disperse the crowds.

The United States and other countries have condemned the coup and imposed sanctions on the military leaders responsible. The situation in Myanmar remains tense and uncertain, with fears of further violence and a possible civil war

California Governor Gavin Newsom has proposed a plan to pay reparations to descendants of enslaved Black Americans as part of the state's efforts to address systemic racism. The proposal, which is part of a $100 billion budget plan, would allocate $1.4 billion towards direct payments to eligible individuals and their families.

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