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  • Saturday, 24 February 2024
Olivia Dunne details the 'moment my life changed,' wants equal NIL opportunities for men and women

Olivia Dunne details the 'moment my life changed,' wants equal NIL opportunities for men and women

Gymnast Olivia Dunne has opened up about the "moment her life changed" when she found out she would no longer be able to compete in college gymnastics due to her decision to monetize her social media presence. In an essay for ESPN, Dunne detailed the challenges she faced in navigating the new Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL) rules in college sports and called for equal opportunities for male and female athletes.

Dunne, a former member of the US national gymnastics team, had signed a letter of intent to compete at LSU. However, when the NCAA announced that student-athletes could profit from their name, image, and likeness, Dunne made the decision to monetize her social media presence by creating a YouTube channel, launching merchandise, and signing a deal with a gymnastics equipment company.

Despite receiving approval from LSU's compliance office and the NCAA, Dunne was informed by LSU's coach that she would no longer be able to compete for the team due to concerns about potential conflicts of interest. Dunne called the decision "devastating" and said that it felt like the "moment her life changed."

In her essay, Dunne argued that male athletes have more opportunities to profit from NIL deals than female athletes, citing the fact that many male athletes have larger social media followings and more lucrative sponsorship deals. She called for equal opportunities for male and female athletes to monetize their social media presence and for schools and the NCAA to support athletes in pursuing NIL deals.

Dunne's story highlights the challenges that student-athletes face in navigating the new NIL rules and the need for schools and the NCAA to provide more support and guidance. It also sheds light on the gender disparities that exist in college sports and the need for greater equity and inclusion.

In response to Dunne's essay, many have expressed their support for her and her call for equal opportunities for male and female athletes. Some have also criticized LSU's decision to bar Dunne from competing and called for greater clarity and consistency in how schools and the NCAA enforce the NIL rules.

As the NCAA and schools continue to grapple with the new NIL rules, it is clear that there is still much work to be done to ensure that all student-athletes have the opportunity to profit from their name, image, and likeness and to address the gender disparities that exist in college sports. Dunne's story serves as a powerful reminder of the importance of equity and inclusion in college athletics and the need for athletes to have a voice in shaping the future of the sport.

 

Gymnast Olivia Dunne has opened up about the "moment her life changed" when she found out she would no longer be able to compete in college gymnastics due to her decision to monetize her social media presence. In an essay for ESPN, Dunne detailed the challenges she faced in navigating the new Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL) rules in college sports and called for equal opportunities for male and female athletes.

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