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  • Saturday, 24 February 2024
OpenAI CEO says era of giant AI models is over

OpenAI CEO says era of giant AI models is over

The era of giant artificial intelligence (AI) models may be coming to an end, according to the CEO of OpenAI, Sam Altman. Speaking at the Collision Conference, Altman said that current models, such as GPT-3, are becoming too expensive to train and their growing size and complexity makes them difficult to maintain. Altman suggested that the future of AI lies in developing more efficient and specialised models, as well as new methods for training them. OpenAI has already started exploring this avenue by developing smaller, more energy-efficient models, such as GPT-Neo, which is a fraction of the size of GPT-3 but still capable of natural language processing. Altman's comments follow recent debates around the ethical and environmental implications of large-scale AI models, which require huge amounts of computational power and contribute to rising energy consumption.

Altman also commented on the ongoing debate around AI regulation, arguing that more rules and guidelines are needed to ensure the technology is developed responsibly. He called for greater transparency around AI development and for companies to collaborate on creating ethical standards. However, Altman also warned against overly strict regulation, which could stifle innovation and create barriers to entry for smaller companies. He suggested that AI development should be guided by a set of principles, such as promoting human well-being and protecting privacy, rather than strict rules.

Altman's comments come at a time when the field of AI is undergoing rapid expansion, with the technology increasingly being integrated into industries ranging from healthcare to finance. However, the growing use of AI has also raised concerns around issues such as bias, privacy and accountability, leading to calls for greater regulation. Earlier this year, the European Union proposed a set of new AI rules, aimed at promoting transparency, accountability and human oversight of the technology. Other countries, including the US and China, are also developing their own AI regulations.

In addition to his role as CEO of OpenAI, Altman is also a prominent venture capitalist, having previously served as president of startup accelerator Y Combinator. In his talk, he highlighted the importance of investment in AI research and development, arguing that it is key to unlocking the technology's potential. Altman also emphasised the need for more diverse representation in the AI industry, calling for greater participation from underrepresented groups, such as women and minorities.

Altman's comments reflect a growing recognition within the AI community that the future of the technology may lie in developing smaller, more specialised models, rather than simply scaling up existing ones. This approach could help to address some of the ethical and environmental concerns around large-scale AI models, while also enabling more targeted and efficient applications of the technology. However, it remains to be seen how this shift will play out in practice, and how regulators and companies will adapt to the changing landscape of AI development.

 

The era of giant artificial intelligence (AI) models may be coming to an end, according to the CEO of OpenAI, Sam Altman. Speaking at the Collision Conference, Altman said that current models, such as GPT-3, are becoming too expensive to train and their growing size and complexity makes them difficult to maintain. Altman suggested that the future of AI lies in developing more efficient and specialised models, as well as new methods for training them. OpenAI has already started exploring this avenue by developing smaller, more energy-efficient models, such as GPT-Neo, which is a fraction of the size of GPT-3 but still capable of natural language processing. Altman's comments follow recent debates around the ethical and environmental implications of large-scale AI models, which require huge amounts of computational power and contribute to rising energy consumption.

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