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  • Saturday, 24 February 2024
Remote workers became younger, better educated, more likely to move during pandemic: survey

Remote workers became younger, better educated, more likely to move during pandemic: survey

A new survey shows that the pandemic has had a significant impact on the demographics and behaviors of remote workers. The survey, conducted by online employment platform FlexJobs, found that remote workers became younger, more educated, and more likely to move during the pandemic.

According to the survey, the average age of remote workers dropped from 46 to 42 during the pandemic. This trend is particularly pronounced among Gen Z and millennial workers, who are more likely to prioritize flexibility and work-life balance when choosing a job.

Remote workers also became better educated during the pandemic, with 54% holding a bachelor's degree or higher, compared to 49% before the pandemic. This trend is particularly notable among women, who are now more likely than men to hold a bachelor's degree or higher.

The pandemic also prompted many remote workers to reconsider where they live. According to the survey, 28% of remote workers moved to a new city or state during the pandemic, and 17% are considering a move in the near future. This trend is particularly pronounced among Gen Z and millennial workers, who are more likely to prioritize quality of life factors like affordable housing and outdoor recreation opportunities when choosing a place to live.

The survey also found that remote workers are more likely to prioritize mental health and work-life balance than in-person workers. 51% of remote workers cited work-life balance as a top priority, compared to 42% of in-person workers, and 45% of remote workers cited mental health as a top priority, compared to 33% of in-person workers.

Despite the many benefits of remote work, the survey also found that remote workers continue to face challenges. 38% of remote workers cited loneliness and isolation as a major challenge, while 26% cited difficulty disconnecting from work and 21% cited difficulty collaborating with colleagues.

Overall, the survey highlights the profound impact that the pandemic has had on the workforce. Remote work has become more popular and widespread than ever before, and it has had a significant impact on the demographics and behaviors of workers. As the pandemic continues to evolve, it is likely that remote work will remain a popular option for many workers, particularly younger workers who prioritize flexibility and work-life balance.

 

A new survey shows that the pandemic has had a significant impact on the demographics and behaviors of remote workers. The survey, conducted by online employment platform FlexJobs, found that remote workers became younger, more educated, and more likely to move during the pandemic.

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