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  • Thursday, 29 February 2024
Second 'Tennessee Three' lawmaker could be reinstated Wednesday

Second 'Tennessee Three' lawmaker could be reinstated Wednesday

A second Tennessee lawmaker of the so-called "Tennessee Three" group could be reinstated to her position on Wednesday. The state's House Ethics Committee is scheduled to meet to discuss the case of Representative David Byrd, who was expelled from the House in 2018 after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Byrd is one of three Tennessee lawmakers who were accused of sexual misconduct by women who were underage at the time of the alleged incidents. Byrd has denied the allegations, but the other two lawmakers resigned from their positions in 2018.

Earlier this month, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled that expelled lawmakers can seek to be reinstated to their positions. The ruling came after Byrd filed a lawsuit against the House, claiming that his expulsion violated his constitutional rights.

If the Ethics Committee votes to reinstate Byrd, he could return to the House as early as next week. However, some lawmakers have expressed concerns about allowing Byrd to return, given the serious nature of the allegations against him.

In other news, the Biden administration has announced new sanctions against Russia in response to what it called "harmful foreign activities." The sanctions target individuals and entities that the U.S. government believes are involved in Russia's efforts to interfere in U.S. elections and carry out cyberattacks against U.S. entities.

The sanctions also target Russia's intelligence services, including the Federal Security Service (FSB) and the Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU). The U.S. government has accused these agencies of carrying out cyberattacks against U.S. entities, including the SolarWinds hack, which affected multiple federal agencies and private companies.

The Biden administration has also expelled ten Russian diplomats from the U.S. and imposed new restrictions on the Russian government's ability to issue sovereign debt.

In response, the Russian government has vowed to retaliate against the U.S. and accused the Biden administration of escalating tensions between the two countries. The Russian Foreign Ministry called the sanctions "unacceptable" and warned that Russia would respond "in the most severe way possible."

Finally, the U.S. has announced that it will begin to withdraw its remaining troops from Afghanistan on May 1, with the goal of completing the withdrawal by September 11. The decision to withdraw was announced by President Biden last week, and was met with mixed reactions from lawmakers and the public.

Some lawmakers have expressed concern that the withdrawal could lead to a resurgence of the Taliban, which was ousted from power in 2001 by U.S.-led forces. Others have praised the decision as a necessary step toward ending America's longest war.

The withdrawal comes as Afghanistan is facing increasing violence and instability, with the Taliban continuing to launch attacks on Afghan government forces and civilians. The Afghan government has been engaged in peace talks with the Taliban, but progress has been slow and uncertain.

 

A second Tennessee lawmaker of the so-called "Tennessee Three" group could be reinstated to her position on Wednesday. The state's House Ethics Committee is scheduled to meet to discuss the case of Representative David Byrd, who was expelled from the House in 2018 after allegations of sexual misconduct.

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