Dark Mode
  • Saturday, 24 February 2024
This is America: The 'watering down' of AP African American Studies

This is America: The 'watering down' of AP African American Studies

The College Board, the organization that administers Advanced Placement (AP) exams in the United States, has been criticized for "watering down" its AP African American Studies course. The course, which was introduced in 2020, was designed to provide a comprehensive overview of African American history and culture, but some educators say that it falls short of this goal.

Critics argue that the AP African American Studies course has been watered down in several ways. For example, they point to the fact that the course does not include any readings from the Black Panther Party or Malcolm X, two major figures in the history of African American activism. They also argue that the course places too much emphasis on cultural topics, such as music and literature, and not enough on the social and political forces that have shaped African American history.

Some educators have also criticized the way that the course is structured. They argue that the course does not provide enough time for students to engage in critical thinking and analysis, and that it relies too heavily on multiple-choice questions that do not allow for nuanced responses.

The College Board has defended its AP African American Studies course, saying that it was developed with input from a diverse group of educators and scholars. They also say that the course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of African American history and culture, and that it meets rigorous academic standards.

However, some educators say that the College Board's response is not sufficient. They argue that the organization needs to do more to ensure that the AP African American Studies course reflects the full range of African American experiences, and that it provides students with the skills and knowledge they need to understand and engage with these experiences.

This debate comes at a time when many educators and activists are calling for a greater emphasis on African American history and culture in American schools. The Black Lives Matter protests that erupted across the country in the summer of 2020 brought renewed attention to the issue of systemic racism and police brutality, and sparked a national conversation about the need to address these issues in schools.

As this conversation continues, it is clear that the College Board's AP African American Studies course will be a key part of the debate. While some educators and activists have criticized the course for falling short of their expectations, others see it as an important step towards a more comprehensive and inclusive curriculum. Ultimately, the success of the course will depend on how well it reflects the full range of African American experiences, and how well it prepares students to engage with these experiences in a meaningful and nuanced way.

 

The College Board, the organization that administers Advanced Placement (AP) exams in the United States, has been criticized for "watering down" its AP African American Studies course. The course, which was introduced in 2020, was designed to provide a comprehensive overview of African American history and culture, but some educators say that it falls short of this goal.

Comment / Reply From